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. >> and in washington, msnbc and "time" senior political analyst, mark halperin. thanks so much, everybody, for being with us. >> morning. >> a very provocative, according to "the wall street journal," proposal that tim geithner brought over to the republican leaders yesterday. >> how'd that go? >> "the new york times" said it was, quote, loaded with democratic priorities and short on spending cuts. i'm just curious, it didn't go well. obviously, mitch mcconnell laughed at the offer, which i would have laughed at the offer, too. >> you would have laughed out loud at the treasury secretary? making a presentation? >> you know what i actually would have said? >> what? >> listen, we're all busy people. this is a critical time. if you're going to come over here and insult us and intentionally try to provoke us, you can do that. but i'm going back to work now. and i'd walk out. listen, this thing, $1.6 trillion of revenue, of new taxes, no specific cuts according to "the new york times" and "wall street journal." actually, $50 billion more in stimulus spending and no specific spending cuts. it was a nonsta
-- [laughter] but the title is "miracle at philadelphia." and that is not wrong. washington, of course, was the presiding officer of the convention. the american constitution was by accident and design. the delegates -- the first month, would there be a president, would be a council, with the president have an absolute veto? at the end of the month, none of these things for resolved. at some points, at the delegates would say, the 18th century equivalent of we are out of fear. washington would say, gentlemen, please stay. you did not walk out on the general. and stay for three months and finish the document. in historygreat if's is what if jefferson had been at philadelphia? it is interesting that two of america's greatest thinkers john adams and thomas jefferson were not at philadelphia. adams was the american minister to the court of st. james. jefferson the american minister to paris. jefferson made a tremendous contribution. he sent to his friend madison over 200 bucks -- books on political thought, political history. my surmise is that some of those books must have been about the
away from the fiscal cliff. we have fox team coverage. chief washington correspondent james rosen is at the white house to tell us about the president's return to the campaign trail sort of. but we begin with the chief congressional correspondent mike emanuel and another reason that the talk reconciliation so important. good evening, mike. >> good evening. there are strong suggestions that the nation's debt problem may be worse than $16 trillion and counting and key lawmakers are saying it's time to slash spending. >> i can cut $600 billion more out of the federal government tomorrow. nobody would know a difference except for the people employed by the programs here in washington, d.c. >> when asked by fox what he would be willing to cut, the senate majority leader didn't offer anything new. >> remember, we have already done more than $1 billion worth of cuts. we have done that. so we need to get some credit for that. and the negotiations that take place. >> 42 business organizations sent this letter to top lawmakers urging congress not to increase taxes writing, "we strongly urge
came together to take your country back. [applause] you gave washington a laser-like message to listen to the people. [applause] you have done an incredible job of getting this country turned back around to the country that our founders established, a country that came from the people and you have changed the country to your massive efforts. i compliment you for it, and it was really the way you did it. as i have said, my role in life is to be the grain of sand to the oyster. you irritates the oyster and out comes a pearl. i have been your grain of sand that you chose. it has been an honor to be your grain of sand in this process. we will continue to make pearls as necessary in the future. fair enough? [applause] the american people have spoken. they have chosen governor clinton. congratulations. >> boo! >> wait a minute. the only way we are going to make it work, if we all team up together. let's give governor clinton a big round of applause. but for get the election. forget the election. the hard work is in front of us. we must all work together to rebuild our great country. you, the
to the washington area arriving outside of washington. thursday on washington journal with both chambers returning to washington next week, we will speak with our guest about what lies ahead and scott wilson. washington journal is life every morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern. analysts and the former director participated in a bipartisan panel examining the next steps for the president and congress hosted by laszlo strategies. this is over an hour. >> who loo>> good morning. welcome. i am founder and president of this organization which is laszlo strategies. it does strategic communication but we're not partisan and i am very honored and delighted to have a terrific set of panels to offer the audience today. we have to audiences, a live audience here, we are in the rayburn office building in a hearing room of the foreign affairs committee. i would like to thank congressman berman for his service. it is an incredible thing to have to serve or be willing to serve. it is a painful process to go through negative campaigning. i think the american voters odette of gratitude to all who are willing to serve whe
there are rules in place. you know, there is some things we do not want washington to do. we do not want politicians in washington, most of whom are male, to control health-care decisions that women can make for themselves. [applause] sopnow, for a year's we as a president who share these beliefs. his name was bill clinton. his economic plan and the ask the wealthiest americans to pay a little bit more so we could reduce the deficit still invest in the skills and ideas of our people. at the time the republicans in congress and the senate candidates by the name of mitt -- i don't want you to boo, i want you to vote. i want you to vote. the republican candidates by the name of mitt romney said bill clinton's plans would hurt the economy and kill jobs. turns out the mouth was just as bad then as it is now. -- the math was just as bad then as it is now. america created 23 million new jobs. our deficit had turned into a surplus. florida, we know our ideas work. we also know their ideas do not. because we try their ideas, too. we tried giving insurance companies and oil companies free rein to
a cushion going into the counties around washington. >> and the more suburban -- obama will get a big a big scor. >> we haven't seen the vote tallies in virginia. and joining us on set is the arcitect -- >> call me "winner" house races? your job was to protect the majority or grow this. is it possible the republicans may net seats? >> we will get them in non- traditional areas. we will get them because we fought hard. this means you get to do a lot of things you wouldn't normally do. one goal of mine, four years ago, was to make sure we were a national party with a national message, to sell thit that way. john boehner backed it up and eric cantor with a great job. >> early numbers from ohio and virginia, you may be one of the few happy republicans in tonigh. >> how do you feel about the washington. >> we put a lot of work into this. the rcc is about winning. cantor and boehner were with us -- winning back twice. you have to prove you can do it. >> for those watching, the congressman runs the campaign committee. controls the money that is spent -- what is one district you will win tonight th
against human desire. back cannot work. i am a student at george washington university. there is a large push from the and the price of a community about legalization of marijuana. -- from the undergraduate timidity about legislation and marijuana. could this lead to a nationwide reform movement? >> it is different. i presume the undergraduate movement at gwi is people who want to get something. temperance movement was to deny somebody else opportunity to get something. the women's movement that was the firast mass move apart -- movement for prohibition was very noble. women were victimized by prohibition in horrible ways. women have no voting rights, the bourse was a rarity. -- women had no voting rights, divorce was a rarity. it was an effort to free the family, free women from this. it is hard to get my arms around comparison between that and an undergraduate desire for marijuana. >> most major changes in the country, from popular movements, some of them start on college campuses, some in other places. >> there is a meaningful parallel. it is generational. the same generation that is
prime minister salam fayyad. he's in washington to attend the 2012 saban forum on u.s./israel relations. it's my understanding you were against this at first. is that true? and if so, how do you feel now? >> no. i never was against it. as a matter of fact, i was very much a part of the thinking -- >> did you think it was time now? or some time down in the future? >> given the frustrations that we palestinians have had with the political process, it has not been productive. there's no question that we needed to pursue any and all available options to us. and the international law -- with the national diplomacy. and this was one of them. the question for me all along was how best to do it. provide us with some leverage going forward because what we really want end of day is genuine state where our people can live as free people with dignity. >> at the end we were just talking in the break, does this end up helping or hurting your relationship with the united states, your pursuit of something even more tangible? >> i think it depends a lot on what is done to deal with it. and whether or no
in washington that we've enjoyed so much over the past two years. >> that actually is the question before we get to our panel. we have a lot of the same still to come. what will be different and what is the lesson learned from this? >> well, it's status quo. you've got the president sitting in charge of the executive branch, obviously, president obama. the house remains in republicans' control. and the senate -- i think, you know, big pickup for the depths in the senate. all of these key races that were supposed to be so close got blown out. that's really where the soul searching's going to take place. because as i said i've said repeatedly for four years, when you run in the house, you can beat something with nothing. and i'm living proof of that. i did it in 1994. >> he undercuts himself. >> but when you run in the senate and the electorate expands, you've got to be a bit more toward the middle. and when you run for the white house, you'd better have a governing philosophy that will pull bucks county in pennsylvania, that will pull the i-4 corridor and that will pull these swing states. i'll t
. >> caller: thank you. the people are so tired of the fighting in washington. like the one candidate said, if they don't do their job they do not get paid. we, the people come have got to start taking these matters into hands because we are sick of it. and, you know, what i would like to tell john boehner is don't give in to this craziness. this is nothing but craziness. and i watched harry reid yesterday. you know, he talked and he talked and he really said nothing. then he went on about dance, dance, dance and i thought to myself all you do is dance around with these bills that they send. the house will have a bill, they send it to the senate and what does he do? dances around it and never addresses it. >> host: know by partisanship than for you? >> caller: no, absolutely none. then when he left the stage and was walking off, the man -- i feel bad for him that he just can't get it together -- he grabbed ahold of the flag. he was falling. then he grabbed ahold of low wall and at that point i said uh oh that man needs to go home. he's too old to be there. he doesn't do his job and is coll
7% for the last month. largely because concerns about the standoff in washington over how to deal with the fiscal cliff. well talk about all of these issues at play with two special guest hosts. wharton professor of finance jeremy siegel and trusted american businessman steve forbes. both onset and ready to start this discussion at 6:00. first, though, andrew has a few of the top business headlines. >>> let's talk about some of the headlines this morning. cisco systems buying cloud network start up meraki for $1.2 billion in cash. it was founded in 2006 by members of m.i.t.'s laboratory for computer science. joe, i don't know if you take credit for any of that. bp plans to spend up to $5.9 billion buying back stock. last week the oil giant agreed to pay record criminal penalties over the deepwater horizon disaster. and americans are carrying more credit card debt and being less diligent about making on time payments. trans union now reporting that average credit card debt for borrowers grew 4.9% in the third quarter and meantime the rate of credit card payments at least 93 days ov
. >> janet. george washington university school of public health. there was a lot of discussion on women's issues. i am wondering if you can speak to the role of gender in the governing. we are seeing more candidates who are successful in their elections and one state's -- is entirely female. >> kelly ayote. when you have that kind of coalition and the democratic party and that remarkable picture of the congressional committee of all republican and not white men talking about contraception or ever was before the committee at the time, that is an image of perjury is exactly why republicans are having a hard time in connecting with female voters in that gender gap. >> romney did significantly improve among white women. not only did not college white women, but also the college white women. this is the first time the democrats have lost them since 1988. >> there is also of the marriage gap. if you are a married woman, you vote different in different ways. that is another thing the republican party is facing. there is new to an era where you bought your identity rather than your interest. >>
from the outside in washington. simultaneously, there's something else under way this morning within the republican party saying we have to change. we cannot go on like this because we keep narrowing the base, and there are a lot of republicans, very senior republicans who have had success in the past and looked at that primary procedure and saw that as a prescription for what happened last night. they were running a retro campaign in the 21st century when things have changed, and the obama people were running a pote modern campaign with technology and looking at the diverse electorate we now have. >> some people say republican soul searching, other republicans say it will be civil war. >> no question. paul ryan is a leader of this party. is it that they were not conservative enough? the reality is mitt romney won a near historic portion of the white vote in america, and he suffered a very bad loss. that's because the country looks different. it has changed. the party has got to find a way to reach out to latinos, the fastest growing voting bloc to become a more diverse party with th
it. >> get over what? what are you talking about? >> all of you are in here. in washington, msnbc and "time" magazine senior political analyst, mark halperin. >> richard's in here? >> i don't know why. i'm serious. what's going on? also, look at this cast we have today, the author of "thomas jefferson, the art of power," historian jon meacham. is meacham here? meacham, look at him. >> lots of books. >> and willie, congratulations on your newest honor. >> thank you. are you in nashville, jon meacham? >> i'm in washington. going to be in nashville tomorrow. >> he needs a pipe in that setting. >> yes, he should, and a fireplace. >> you're saying donny's milking this thing. >> we talked about it for ten minutes. we got on the set and donny's, like, can we do this again today? >> unfortunately, joe and i are on what's called the decaying page. guys falling apart. we're on the presidential page. >> you look good. >> right next to brad pitt. >> that kind of ruins it. okay. well, there you go. >> okay, take that down, please. >> oh! >> there we go. >> it's too early for this. >> it is. ta
, woman and child in greece. today voters could make washington state the first state to make and use and sell marijuana. you would have to be over 21 to buy over a licensed dealer. the federal government can challenge the legality. >> brian: candidates, convincing the american people is half of the battle. they have to convince 535 memberings of congress to take their side, too. who better to do the job. back to the political panel who experienced that for themselves x. first of all for the middle of gridlock, how do we break it can they do. >> if romney gets elected you start with a new day. the republicans would try to move something forward and if the president gets reelected you start where you are today with a lot of the grid lock. >> brian:ent senator baye. you said no one was doing anything. do you see it changing if president obama gets another four years. >> i think he will think about his legacy and there is a chance and he will probably move to the middle and embrace the simpson-bowles report and make compromises with the entitlement reform. my guess he would be willing to
in the evening-- this is in the collar area around the distric districf columbia around washington-- are they get anything sense from parts of virginia or any recalling state? >> warner: well, not that they're telling me, gwen. which doesn't mean they aren't, because they had this whole system set up with people at these key precincts with smart phonessably to report both who voted literally, who voted by name, who hadn't yet voted. and staying there to report preliminary returns or returns. so, you know, it may be coming into the war room, which is by the way not here at the convention center but down at what used to be called the boston garden. it's now called the t.d. garden. i have not been able to find out what they're hearing. they did have high hopes fairly early in the evening those counties in northern virginia they would have a clear sense of romney doing expwl, therefore, a very good omen for the evening. >> ifill: i'll really curious about one thing today, mitt romney spent part of his day in two cities in which he is not expected to do well, cleveland and pittsburgh, two industrial c
, it is pressure from the outside of washington. simultaneously, there is something else under way this morning within the republican party saying that we have to change. we cannot go on like this, because we keep narrowing the base, and there are a lot of republicans, very senior republicans who have had success in the past who lookedt that primary procedure and saw that as a prescription to what happened last night. they were running a retro campaign in the 21st century when things have changed and the obama were running a post-modern campaign with technology and the diverse electorate. >> some republicans say a soul searching and other republicans say civil war, david. >> no question that paul ryan is a leader of the party. were they not conservative enough? the fact is that mitt romney won a historic portion of the white vote in america and suffered a bad loss, because the country has changed and looks different. they have to become a more diverse party with the ability to shed some of the orthodoxy around taxes, around spending, over the role of government. and this process is going to beg
around louunn coty. the average income is $115,000. very close to washington d.c. in the southwest in dickinson county $29,000. >> it's a tremendous disparity. so much of those jobs in that urban crescent are defense-related. that's been a particular issue in this campaign. as this state looks to what may happen after the election with regard to see questions traition of those automatic and indiscriminate cuts that will take place in january 2 if the spending plan is not developed. so there's a lot of attention, a lot of focus on what may happen after see questions traition. that will be deeply interesting to those people who are making that kind of money because so much of that is oriented around the defense industry. >> sreenivasan: kathy lewis, thanks so much for your time. >> thank you. ifill: now let's go to 30,000 feet on this evening from presidential historians and newshour regulars michael beschloss and richard norton smith. you know, michael, i have heard time and time again throughout this campaign that this has been a campaign about small things. the big picture was mis
in bellingham, washington, good afternoon. please go ahead with your question or comment for steven johnson. >> caller: hi, pleasure speaking to you. 8, i was a first wave environmental planner back in the mid '70s, so i'dhead of your ghost -- i'd heard of your ghost maps story. and in -- after i graduated i thought i'd kick around the idea of architecture plus ecology and play with computer models and satellite data late at night without authorization. [laughter] before the term hacker or geospatial intelligence technology was invented. anyway, i became a mr. mom in '82 because that was really going nowhere. today, however, it looks like, you know, cloud technology and c factor computing and a lot of these breakthroughs are going to make three dimensional environmental computing feasible. the problem i saw then was a global vision in a flat world, you know? we didn't really have a three dimensional philosophy. to work with this new technology. and i don't even see it there now. and it's kind of a little troubling, you know? any comments, thoughts? thanks. >> guest: yeah, great. what an int
in the senate, which is contrary to what anybody in washington, i think, thought, even as late as labor day. we know the house is going to stay roughly the same. absent breaking news, i bring you no precinct returns from florida. i'd like to spend more time on why this is happened, and what that means for us going forward. first, i share the admiration all around for president obama's campaign team. they were tech nickically close to perfect in the first responsibility of a campaign team, that is to identify and turn out voters. they planned it. they executed it. every step of the way, they knew what votes they needed, got out and got them. they began weeks before election day banking favorable votes in states where they had already had people on the ground preplabbed to produce. again, technically, a superb operation, one to set the standard for future campaigns and now you identify your voters, encourage them to turn out, and perhaps some people think by the fourth or fifth visit or phone call verging on harassment to turn themçó out, t it worked. the point i want to make beyond that, howev
of trying to get things accomplished in washington. >> bill mcinturf and peter hart. the best in the business, the best poll and we're so happy and proud to have you and have you as colleagues, thank you very much. >>> mitt romney is touching all bases today, from iowa to ohio, where the campaign is going head to head with the obama team's ground troops, county by county. shawn spicer, shawn, good to see you. i want to ask you about the travel plans. the fact that the romney/ryan team going to pennsylvania has raised a lot of eyebrows, the democrats say it's desperation, because they know they can't win ohio, have to find some other route to 270. republicans in pennsylvania and elsewhere say it's a real campaign. and that there's a real possibility there. tell us what you're seeing on the ground. >> i think we're going to carry ohio. i think we got real shot at pennsylvania. so if you use their metric, the governor and paul ryan have been in ohio extensively over the last couple of days, they'll continue to be there in the last 48 hours that proves that we believe we think we'
was in an obama campaign headquarters on the outskirts of the washington metropolitan area in virginia and i was impressed by the methodical nature of what they did and also the distributed nature of what they did. in other words, everybody didn't come to headquarters. the materials, the lists, the walking lists and so forth were all in homes around the region. in other words, people in their individual homes and neighborhoods became the effective campaign headquarters for those areas. they have built on what they did in 2008. they do have a superb ground game. it's going to depend on them getting their own people out in all of these states. they have it divided in terms of types of voters. they have it divided by location. the analogy i use goes to the way the israelis operate in the desert. they don't have a lot of water, but they drop a droplet of water on every seed. the romney campaign theory is the older fashioned wave tv advertising, psychology, tie goes to the challenger situation. but it's such a closely divided country where everybody is microtargeting. maybe that old wave theory j
and republicans hold the house, washington on the morning after is going to look very much like washington the day before. >> of course, nicolle wallace who worked in the pal in/mccain campaign four years ago, george w. bush, the huge issue, overwhelming issue, the economy. that is the issue that mitt romney wanted to make his calling card. >> that's right. they are looking at the same information we're looking at as people are still voting, you know, they're hoping that's what they had in mind when they went to the polls day. they made a sales pitch that was 100% about voters being dissatisfied with the pace of recovery. that was the beginning, middle and end of mitt romney's pitch to the american people and they're on the same pins and needles we are to see if it worked. >> donna brazile, one thing we saw, the exitle pos and a surprise to me in the exit polls if we can pull it up now, we asked about the direction of the country and one thing that it showed, donna brazile, who worked for campaign manager for al gore back in 2000, a dramatic reduction over the last year in people who think the cou
. in the suburbs of washington. fairfax county and next door in prince william county. in 2008 in the counties president obama did well against mccain. 61% to 389%. in fairfax. prince william, louden, 54-vi. the president will need to do well there. he has to do well there to run up the vote total and make up for romney strength in south and west of virginia. watching virginia very closely when the polls close. >> well done. >> a state that is critical is virginia. i went for president obama in 2008, but romney needs it. mike emanuel live in richmond. good evening. >> election officials describe turn-out as robust and ahead of 2008 levels. experts predicting the record turn-out in the range of 4 million voters. with long lines across virginia that could be achieved. republican vice presidential nominee paul ryan made one final visit to virginia. the richmond area this afternoon. just hours before the polls close at 7:00 p.m. ryan told campaign staff and volunteers this is are a great effort. they should keep it up. wake up tomorrow morning knowing they did evening they could in virginia. for r
the republican mayor ordered them closed. joining me now from washington is karen finney a former dnc director, msnbc political analyst. and here with me is the great eugene robinson. welcome to both of you. gene, these long lines in florida are there because rick scott decided to cut the early voting days almost in half. 2.5 million people have voted early. yet we're expected to believe this has got nothing to do with politics. what is this man doing? >> well, there are two american traditions here at work. one is vote k problems in florida. this is something we like to do. and the second is republicans trying to restrict the franchise. if you can narrow the electorate and keep those democratic people, the system and throughout this election cycle we're seeing more of it. >> eugene, you use a voice that sounds accepting. this is appalling. >> i don't mean to. it is appalling. we've seen it before. >> people died in 1965 for the right to vote and now they're being prevented from doing so. >> exactly. exactly. >> karen, in ohio the big story is the states provisional ballot. the republican in c
. the president was right the other day when he said he can't change washington from the inside, only from the outside. we will give him that chance soon. >> now, when i'm elected, i'm going to work with republicans and democrats in congress, i'm going to meet regularly with leaders and identify the good men and women on both sides of the aisle that care more about the country than they do about politics. now, the president were to be reelected, he's of course going to continue his war on oil, coal, and natural gas and when i'm elected we're going to change course and energy to build jobs and help with prices at the pump and achieve north american independency in eight years. now, if the president were to be reelected he'd continue to crush small business with his plan to raise taxes, expand regulations to impose obamacare. i care about small business. i see it as a means for people to fulfill their dreams. last week, i met rota elliott, virginia, richmond. she's been running her family restaurants for years, the business has been in her family, bill's barbecue for 82 years and at that po
conditions of declining public order. >> i guess there's a tradition in washington d.c. whenever one is asked about making a position come you make one of those predictions. the next 18 months are critical, something along those lines. going to do something very similar. >> that won't won't do it on the sunday morning talk show. >> what i'm going to say here as i think one thing our discussion has alluded to is between the presidency and egypt in a variety of bureaucratic entries. not just the military, but the deep state is going to be very critical. the question of whether he will call a will be extremely important. it's not just the question of that compensation we been waiting for between the president and the various bureaucratic powers, the president, particularly the military and security service. we also look at the relationship between the president and the ear of the muslim brotherhood. is there enough sufficient room for tension between the two sides in such an irreverent end up in a presidency can emerge clicks if that actually happens someday, that sort of the new ballgame in the
at the washington post national poll. they took a look across the country and found this race tied. 48% each. that does left 4% undecided. i will get to that in just a minute. let's take a look at the real clear politics national average. they take the polls and combine them and take the average. 1/10 percent lead for president obam a. again, you have 4%, or 5% undecided. the question i keep asking, david, is if after four years of an obama administration, people are undecided, might they not be inclined to try the guy who hasn't had the office yet? >> they might. we have seen in past electrics, where undecided voters at this late date, by and large go with the challenger. but the question, too, given how decide divided the country is, are they going to show up? if they don't, who does that hurt? who does that help? it also is interesting because you have this race, by and large, focused on about 10 battleground states, very intensely treally hasn't been a national campaign, given that everybody's been traveling to the same, you know, 8 to 10 states. i think that, you know, could have an eff
not. flatout. >> there is one great predictor, 18 of the 19 times since 1936 the washington redskins last home game dictated the winner of the election a couple days later. the incumbent is tied to whether or not the redskins win or lose and the incumbent, president obama's body is tied to a loss. >> but the defecating on the lawn sign this is the party of occupy wall street. so, are we really surprised? >> they are into fertilizer. >> four years ago the "new york daily news," the 5th largest in the country, consider add blue-collar paper, endorsed president obama, i am a columnist for the paper and they said endorsed mitt romney saying that the hopes of those days and everything the president promised was unfulfilled. i know he will not win new york. but how much dot endorsements matter? >> at least from a tone perspective on the campaign you can see that mitt romney has fought his way through a tough primary and has worked so hard he has convinced many papers, including in wisconsin, that paper flipped from obama support in 2008 to romney in 2012. you do not do that without effort
also believe, by the way, there are some things washington should not do, for example, we don't need a bunch of politicians trying to control health care decisions that women are perfectly capable of making themselves. [ cheers and applause ] for four years, we had a president who shared these beliefs. his name was bill clinton. and it's interesting, when he first came into office, his economic plan asked the wealthier americans to play a little more so we could reduce our deficit and invest in the skills and ideas of our people. and at the time, the republican congress and a certain senate candidate by the name of mitt romney -- [ crowd booing ] don't boo, vote. vote. you don't need to boo. folks can't hear you boo, but they can hear you vote. anyway, this candidate, mr. romney, along with the republican congress, they all said, bill clinton's playing us terrible. it will hurt the economy. it's going to kill jobs. turns out, their math was just as bad then as it is now because by the end of bill clinton's second term, america has created 23 million new jobs. incomes were up, poverty
across the country are urging washington to get it back to the before it's too late. they're gathering in washington, d.c. to lay out the issues their cities will face if there's no compromise. pretty serious issues, by the way. among the mayors there, democrat mayor michael nutter of philadelphia and republican mayor scott smith of mesa, arizona. mr. mayors, you were both at the white house last week before the president met with congressional leaders. what was your sense of where things stood and what was your message to the president? >> well, i was pleased to be there with the u.s. conference of mayors and vice president, scott smith who is on the show and i was serving as president. other mayors, probably a total of 14 of us, talking with vice president biden last thursday afternoon about the situation that we need a balanced, bipartisan approach to dealing with the issue of cuts, as well as revenues. these are serious matters that can affect cities all across the united states of america. you cannot solely cut your way out of the amount of debt that we have. so this issue must be
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